How to Prepare a Casserole on the Grill or Smoker

How to Prepare a Casserole on the Grill | Dish Dish


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Casseroles are the perfect examples of comfort food we often crave. Being a one-dish meal, serving just a simple salad with it would suffice. You can make casseroles as cheesy as you want, so it’s equally delicious for those who prefer that and those who don’t. Casseroles can be dished up as easy appetizers, side dishes and main dishes, too.

While people often make casseroles in the oven, I decided to try something different. I was able to successfully make the perfect casserole with nothing but an electric smoker! If you are thinking that casseroles can only be baked in an oven, then I just proved you wrong!

Don’t worry, the process is not too different from the oven-baking process. With the correct mix of ingredients and grilling techniques, you can have the most delicious casserole you ever tasted. I have also given a casserole recipe that I did in the oven, in case you don’t feel like grilling or using the smoker.

BBQ Chicken Casserole

This is the awesome chicken casserole recipe I was talking about doing in the smoker. The process is not too complicated as you will see. Just grab a grill and the ingredients and work your grilling magic.

Ingredients

1 tablespoon olive oil
one finely sliced onion
2.2 pounds of chicken pieces (including drumsticks and thighs)
2 cloves of garlic, crushed
2 carrots, chopped into small chunks
20 oz. (600 ml) of warmed chicken stock
1 pound of potatoes, peeled and cut into large pieces
2 stalks of celery, sliced
2 leeks, chopped finely
1 tablespoon of leveled, plain flour
2 cups of water
2 sprigs of fresh rosemary
a lemon, cut in half

Directions

Now that you have the ingredients all sorted out, it’s time to get grilling!

1. Set your grill smoker to its highest temperature setting. This is similar to preheating an oven. (In case you’re wondering if you might need the oven anytime soon — Well, you won’t!) Grilling expert, Dan Morrison, says that Masterbuilt smokers work best for making casseroles compared to average grills.

2. Take a pan and pour olive oil into it. Saute the onions in the oil for around 20 seconds. Take an aluminium foil container and place the sauteed onions into it. Add the chicken pieces, garlic, carrots, potatoes, celery, leeks, and chicken stock, and properly mix them together. Stir the flour into the water, and add to the mix. Finally, add rosemary sprigs. Squeeze the juice from one half of the lemon; place the other half piece of lemon inside the container as well. Do not cover the aluminium foil container. (The water is added to ensure that the risk of burning the ingredients is low.)

3. Check to see if the grilling temperature has reached 700 degrees F. Once the grill has reached this temperature, place the casserole inside the grill. Cover up the grill with a lid.

4. You don’t need to open the lid and check on how the food is doing. Resist that temptation, and just wait for approximately 20 minutes.

5. Remove the casserole from the grill / smoker. Your casserole will be smoking hot, ready for serving at your barbecue event.


Baked Potato Casserole Dish
 

If you’re not up for grilling and would rather stick to the traditional baking method, here is a recipe for you that combines yummy potatoes, turkey bacon and cheddar cheese to create the most perfect side dish.

Ingredients

8 medium-sized potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
1 cup of low-fat milk
1/2 cup of light sour cream
1 tsp. of salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper
2 cups of shredded cheddar cheese
6 turkey bacon slices (cooked and crumbled into pieces)
Optional ingredient — use sliced green onions

Directions

1. First, place the potato chunks into a saucepan with enough water to cover the potatoes, and heat to a boil. Cook the potatoes until they appear to be tender (around 15-20 minutes). Drain the water from the pan.

2. Take a casserole dish and grease it. Then preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

3. Add milk, sour cream, pepper and salt to the saucepan containing potatoes and beat the mixture with a handheld mixer until it appears to be smooth.

4. Add 1.5 cups of cheddar cheese and half of the measured bacon into the saucepan. Mix well and then place the mixture in the greased casserole dish.

5. Place the casserole dish into the oven and bake for 25 minutes until the dish is heated through well. Then sprinkle the remaining cheddar cheese over top; additionally, if desired use green onions and remaining bacon as extra toppings. Continue baking for another 3 minutes until the cheese melts.

You could assemble this casserole ahead of time and keep it refrigerated. If baking after refrigeration, you could cover the casserole dish with aluminum foil and bake for 40 minutes instead of 25 minutes. Uncover the dish and use toppings as before and again bake for 3 minutes.

Why Grill Instead Of Bake?

When I told my friends that I ended up grilling a casserole instead of baking one, they were surprised. However, they were even more shocked when they tasted that unique smoky flavor of the casserole. The next time we went outdoor camping, we grilled the casserole and made a few other dishes, having one of the best camping nights ever.

Casseroles are easy to make and don’t take much time to prepare, making them ideal for outdoor cooking or BBQ party grilling. If you’re looking for party grilling ideas, you can read more here.

So, the next time you go out to grill, try grilling different chicken casserole recipes and experiment.

Of course, baking also has its advantages. Baked casseroles can be refrigerated easily, and have lower risk of burning.  While it is possible to create a stew-like casserole in an oven, it’s harder to do the same with a grill.

Slow Cooker Breakfast Casserole - Crockpot Recipe | Dish Dish

One of the best things about a casserole is the ability to increase its nutritional value by adding more vegetables (particularly those high in vitamin A and C). The fiber and protein content in casseroles makes it a good dish for people who are regularly into fitness training.

Casseroles can also serve as main dishes, and kids often love having casseroles for lunch. Preparing a breakfast casserole before setting out to work would be an excellent way to kickstart your morning.

Whether you choose to bake or grill your chicken casserole, that’s completely up to you. You could even try preparing casseroles using a stove. It doesn’t have to be chicken; there are so many kinds of casseroles, including egg, fish, ground beef, mushrooms and vegetable casseroles. Add some variety to yours by experimenting with various herbs and spices to mix the flavors up.

Casseroles could be slow cooked to produce dishes that are similar to stews (just add a little more liquid). Experiment and create your own casserole any way you want — whether you choose to bake, grill or slow cook on a stove.

Easy Fundraising Idea for Your School, Church or Community Group

Easy Fundraising Idea For Your Group

 

Easy Fundraising?

If you have raised a family or been part of a local community for any length of time, you have probably been involved in fundraising in one way or another – with school, church, or a local service or community group.

Quite often it seems that the fundraising effort is arduous, a burden to almost everyone involved, and difficult to administrate or costly to meet minimum requirements, as well as sometimes taking a long time for the group to actually receive the funds they’ve raised.

If your church, school, or group is looking for an easy fundraising idea, we are excited to announce two options for Dish Dish fundraising for your group! We want to help you make money.

Easy Fundraising Idea - Your Group Digital Cookbook

Your Group’s Digital Cookbook

Many church groups, civic groups, community and social clubs have raised money over the years by printing up a cookbook with a collection of members’ favorite recipes, and then selling the cookbooks as a fundraiser.

We would like to welcome you to the digital age and help you create a recipe collection online, easy to update, edit, and add to, with no printing, designing or inventory necessary!

If you have done a cookbook fundraiser before (or been voluntold to start one for your organization), you will be so glad to avoid the layout design process, pre-purchase requirements, lead time for printing, minimum inventory requirements, overages, and storage hassles with this simple fundraiser option.

Raise unlimited funds in 3 simple steps:

1. Your group purchases the fundraising package — below –(only $149 for up to 200 recipes), gathers the recipes and we enter them into your online collection.

2. Raise funds by selling access to this online collection (charge whatever price you choose – $10, $15, $20 – we only keep $2 per sale); we’ll set up your own web page for sales.

3. Digitally deliver to the buyers their instructions (we’ll provide the details for you to send) for accessing the recipe collection online (from any computer or mobile device).

Voila! The sky is the limit on how much money you can raise, with minimal up-front cost and a huge profit margin for your group on each sale.  The person you choose as the administrator of your recipe collection will have access to edit, add, or delete recipes at any time, as well as complete control over granting access to the online cookbook of recipes. Contact us (see below email) with any questions or to get started today!

 

Fundraising Idea for School, Church, Community Group

Product Sales Fundraising

If your group (limited to the Dallas / Fort Worth local area for now) would prefer to sell products, we will help you raise funds, giving your organization 50% of the sales of 3 of our best products. The great thing about these products is that just about everyone can use them – no worries about allergies, diets, size or color preferences, storage, etc., and they make wonderful gifts! We do not require any minimum purchases for your group – so you don’t have to worry about committing to more than you can chew, so to speak. We’re happy to come set up a table at your location, as well, donating 50% of the sales to your group.

Earn 50% with these product sales:

Our eco-friendly bamboo cutting board is a handy size for any kitchen, easy to clean, and makes a great cheese board, too – in case you don’t actually like to cook.

This adorable kitchen apron — “Gather Here with Grateful Hearts” — comes in black, durable smooth fabric (machine washable) with adjustable neck strap, 2 front pockets, and comfortable waist ties.

Lastly, we offer our Digital Recipe Album package for families who would love to put together a digital collection of their family’s favorite recipes to share, create menus and grocery lists, and have fun passing along to the next generation digitally.

We provide the detailed description flyer, order form, and a dedicated web page (if needed) for your customers to place their orders, and deliver the products and funds to you within 3 weeks of end of fundraiser.

With no minimums, this is a fantastic fundraising opportunity for your local Dallas / Fort Worth area group!

For questions or more details, please contact us at support@dishdish.us.

 

Yes, my group would like to purchase the Online Cookbook Fundraising package and get started today!

Price: $149.00

How to Cook Corn on the Cob {+ Recipes} by Stove, Microwave, or Grill

How to Cook Corn on the Cob with Recipes

If you didn’t grow up on a farm or in a family that cooked fresh food on a regular basis, perhaps looking at an ear of corn on the cob and wondering what in the world to do with it is quite perplexing.

While I had the opportunity to grow up intermittently living in a place where we grew some of our own food (including corn, potatoes, tomatoes, cucumbers, melons, green beans, peppers, and squash), my mom also could creatively make a meal out of just about anything; so I was able to learn early on about cooking fresh food in a variety of ways.

Cooking corn on the cob doesn’t have to be scary or complicated, though, and we’re going to break it down for you into simple steps – regardless of whether you prefer using the stove top, oven, microwave, or grill for getting the job done. (See nutrition facts, food safety, and storage tips for fresh corn.)

Picking the Best Corn on the Cob

First steps first. When buying the corn at the farmers market or your local grocery store (assuming you didn’t pluck it right out of your own garden), be sure to look for these signs that you’re getting a good ear of corn.

1. Carefully check over the ear of corn to see if it feels plump and even all around (not squishy or too bumpy in areas).

2. The best ears of corn will have silks that are golden, a bit moist, or possibly just starting to turn brown (be sure not to pick any with blackening silks).

3. Lastly, the husk should still fit tightly around the ear of corn and not be pulling away from it.

Hands shucking corn on the cob | How to cook corn on the cob

 

How to Cook Corn on the Cob on the Stove

When I was growing up, this was the way we cooked our corn most of the time. Just keep in mind that leaving the corn in the water for too long can make it end up kind of tough and chewy, so be sure to set a timer and remove from heat before too long.

1. Shuck the corn ears, removing the husks and silks (just pull down from the top and strip them away all around the ear).

2. Rinse the ears and rub around the ear in a circular motion to finish removing as much of the silks as possible.

3. If desired, trim just a bit off the ends of the ear for easy areas in which to stick the corn cob holders. (BTW, having fun, colorful holders can be a great conversation starter or way to jazz up the conversation with family or dinner guests!)

4. Heat a large pot of water to boiling (depending on the sizes of the pot, this can take up to 10 minutes, so .. plan accordingly). Gently drop in the ears of corn and set a timer for 7 minutes.

5. Remove the pan from heat and allow the corn to sit in the hot water if you’re planning to serve soon; if you’ll be waiting a while, remove the corn from the water and wrap in aluminum foil to keep warm until ready to serve.

I love jazzing up simple corn on the cob with a seasoned butter, which always seems more festive than simple butter and salt (though that is delicious, too!). Try one of these seasoned butter recipes – Street Corn with 3 Flavored Butters or some Roasted Jalapeno Butter or Chipotle Butter.

How to Cook Corn on the Cob in the Microwave

While this would not be my preferred way to cook corn on the cob, it is super easy and quick as well as virtually mess-free. (And if you only have a microwave, such as in a college dorm room, you could still enjoy some fresh corn on the cob!)

Leave the fresh ears of corn inside the husks and cook them on full heat for three minutes. Carefully (they will be hot) remove them from the microwave; gently remove the husks and silks and discard. Slather with some butter and sprinkle with salt to enjoy (with or without corn holders).

How to Cook Corn on the Cob on the Grill

I have to be honest, while I do enjoy the smoky grilled flavor of corn cooked on the grill, usually I’m not willing to plan for the invested extra time and energy it takes to pull that off. However, if you plan ahead and allow enough time to cook it this way, it’s a real treat! Basically, you can choose to cook the corn on the grill either with or without the husks (cooking without the husks will give your corn that charred look and flavor that’s especially nice for particular meals and recipes).

With Husks

Start by soaking the corn (in its husk) in water for 30 minutes (or more, if you prefer).

Place the soaked ears on the grill over medium heat and close the lid. Cook for about 20 minutes, turning once or twice throughout.

Without Husks

Charred option – Shuck the corn ears; spray or brush them with a little vegetable oil and place directly on grill grates, cooking over medium heat for about 10 minutes. Be sure to turn them every few minutes for even cooking.

If you don’t want the charred version – Shuck the ears and wrap them in a double layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Place them on the grill over medium heat, closing the lid, and allow to cook for about 20 minutes, being sure to turn them once or twice during this time.

Grilled, charred corn with butter | How to Cook Corn on the Cob

Eating Corn on the Cob (Recipes)

In case you’re in doubt about how to “properly” eat your corn on the cob once it’s cooked, we have some suggestions – though we don’t at all guarantee these to be “proper”!

1. With holders or without holders? Slather the corn on the cob with your favorite plain or seasoned butter, sprinkle with some salt and have fun eating it just like that.

2. Get fancy with toppings for your corn – after spreading on the butter, top it with some crumbled cojita or feta cheese, a sprinkle of chili powder or red pepper flakes, or some chopped cilantro or green onions. Lots of fabulous options for going a little crazy with your corn. Happy experimenting!

3. Slice the corn kernels off of the cobs and throw them into your favorite salad, dip, soup or casserole, such as these fantastic recipes:

Grilled Corn Salad

Grilled Corn and Crab Dip

Tilapia with Black Beans and Corn

Black Beans and Corn Salsa

Chicken, Green Bean, Corn and Farro Salad

What are your favorite ways to cook up corn on the cob?

Do you have fun family memories around grilling or roasting ears of corn? We love hearing your stories in the comments below!